Thursday, April 7, 2011

Small victory, but is it enough?

PETA finally replied to my emails,

"Dear Ms. ------,

Thank you for contacting PETA about your objections to our contest offering a free vasectomy. We are sorry to have offended you, and we have removed the phrase “in honor of” National Infertility Awareness Week from our website. We understand that this was not a wise choice of words.

Our goal was to focus attention on the tragic suffering and death of homeless dogs and cats. Since the best way to prevent animal companions from having unwanted litters is to spay and neuter them, a kind PETA member offered to cover the cost of a vasectomy for one compassionate man who wants to get himself “snipped” just like his furry friend. Having one’s own child may be a compelling urge for some, but nobody should condemn those who choose to avoid causing pregnancy or any organization that provides them with a means to do so. Many who choose to have a vasectomy consider it a moral conundrum for some of us to be spending thousands of dollars trying to reproduce ourselves when there are homeless children, including some with disabilities, who want for homes, and when the environment is being ravaged as human population increases.

PETA works very hard to prevent the births of puppies and kittens who will end up abandoned in animal shelters or struggling to survive on the streets. Breeding, both purposeful and accidental, is responsible for the euthanasia of millions of these loving companions each year. Sterilization is both the easiest and the most effective means available of ensuring animals’ happiness and safety. Male animals who have been neutered are far less likely to roam far from home or fight. Neutering greatly diminishes and possibly eliminates reproductive urges (which are not the same in dogs as they are in humans). In addition, these animals will never get testicular cancer and run less risk of contracting prostate disease. Female animals who have been spayed avoid the trauma of giving birth and will no longer go into heat.

Consider the fate of the millions of unwanted animals whose parents were never spayed and neutered. Born into a hostile world, they are caged among strangers at animal shelters or, worse, abandoned on the sides of roads. They are run over by cars and attacked by other animals. They are infected with painful, contagious, and deadly diseases. Those unlucky enough to run into cruel humans are often drowned, beaten with baseball bats, suffocated in plastic bags, stabbed, shot, starved, set on fire, used as bait, and tortured in countless other ways. And the saddest tragedy of all is that before they meet some gruesome death, they reproduce, and the cycle of animal suffering continues.

A national organization, SPAY/USA, helps guardians of animal companions who need assistance with the cost of spaying and neutering. You can contact SPAY/USA at the following website and toll-free number:

SPAY/USA
http://www.spayusa.org/
1-800-248-SPAY (7729)

To learn more about issues that affect animal companions, please visit http://www.PETA.org/issues/companion-animals/default.aspx. To make a donation in support of PETA’s campaigns to stop the animal overpopulation crisis, please go to http://www.PETA.org/donate.

Thank you again for contacting us and for the opportunity to share our thoughts.

Sincerely,

The PETA Staff"

So, I replied:

Dear Sir or Madam-

I'm not satisfied with this non-apology. First of all, I never condemned a person for choosing not to have children, I completely respect that choice. In turn, I would appreciate people to respect my own family building desire. My ISSUE is with the inappropriate reference to NIAW and the mockery of millions of infertility suffered nationwide.

Not to mention, talking about the moral conundrum about fertility treatments and insinuating that we should be "saving" children... is out of line. I already emailed about the complexities of adoption, which your organization fails to recognize, and this response further enforces that you have chosen ignorance over education.

Taking down "in honor of" is a step, but leaving the reference up is completely crass and belligerent. Specifically mentioning NIAW and pointing out how you're holding this during that week, is inappropriate. I will not be content until this is taken down.

-Mrs. ------

5 comments:

Stinky said...

agree. good response (by you)

Cyn said...

not enough! they brush off the entire purpose of what we are trying to say and then go on for paragraph upon paragraph to talk about the poor puppies and kitties. we know what your organization does PETA you dont need to tell us about the poor animals. also -- everytime i have been at a shelter the kittens are snatched up within days if not hours of them being put up for adoption. i am all for pet owners being responsible for any litters their pets may have, or for having their pets fixed but that has NOTHING to do with our choice to have children. and for them to say we need to just "save" children already in the world does not sit well with me. id like to know how many PETA members and staff have children NOT through adoption.

thank you for writing them!
your response was excellent!

starfishkittydreams said...

Thank you for pushing back at PETA. That is a terrible and insensitive campaign. It seems only hurtful and cruel to time such a campaign during National Infertility Awareness Week. I am all about treating animals ethically, but this goes too far.

Kristin said...

Preach on sister!

Sarah S said...

PETA Is a bunch of LIARS!! As of 1 p.m. today the term in Honor of Infertility Week is still on their blog and website!!!!!